Zaobao launches book on new immigrants here

Mr Goh presenting a copy of Faces & Stories of Crossroads to Ms Fu at the launch. The minister said the series offers glimpses of how immigrants have "...successfully integrated in Singapore".
Mr Goh presenting a copy of Faces & Stories of Crossroads to Ms Fu at the launch. The minister said the series offers glimpses of how immigrants have "...successfully integrated in Singapore".PHOTO: ALICIA CHAN FOR THE STRAITS TIMES

For the past seven years, Chinese daily Lianhe Zaobao has been chronicling the lives of new immigrants in a weekly section in the newspaper called Crossroads.

A selection of 49 of these stories, written by its journalists, have been compiled into a book, Faces & Stories of Crossroads, which was launched yesterday.

Those featured include the South Koreans behind Korean food establishments in Tanjong Pagar, a trio from the tumultuous Middle East who found peace and stability in Singapore, and foreign brides who had to navigate a new country and culture post-marriage.

At the book launch in Singapore Press Holdings yesterday, Minister for Culture, Community and Youth Grace Fu said the series has offered glimpses of how immigrants "have adapted to our norms, contributed to society and successfully integrated in Singapore".

Ms Fu, who is also National Integration Council chairman, added: "Crossroads has highlighted role models for new immigrants, and encouraged readers to better understand and appreciate people with diverse backgrounds who are now their friends, neighbours and co-workers."

Apart from profiles of immigrants, the articles also touch on topics like financial planning, legal issues and culture. One piece discussed whether having a boss from the same hometown is a boon or a bane, and interviewed staff from Putien Restaurant which hired over 30 married couples from China.

In another article, the founder of popular Chinese hotpot restaurant Ha Di Lao shed light on why he expanded his business into Singapore.

Lianhe Zaobao editor Goh Sin Teck said Crossroads is aimed at helping those with a Chinese background understand the customs and values of Singapore. At the same time, it hopes to give locals a deeper understanding of the lives of immigrants, he added.

The e-book comes in English and Chinese. It can be downloaded for free from the Apple App Store and Google Play Store.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 21, 2016, with the headline 'Zaobao launches book on new immigrants here'. Print Edition | Subscribe