Tickets for Ed Sheeran's Singapore concert sold for up to $850 on Carousell

One listing on Carousell is offering a ticket to the Nov 11 show for $850, while another is offering a pair of tickets to the same show for $1,500.
One listing on Carousell is offering a ticket to the Nov 11 show for $850, while another is offering a pair of tickets to the same show for $1,500.PHOTO: SCREENGRAB FROM CAROUSELL

SINGAPORE - Tickets for Ed Sheeran's widely anticipated concert at the Singapore Indoor Stadium in November are being sold on online marketplace Carousell for up to $850.

Tickets to the British singer's concert on Nov 11 and 12 cost from $148 to $248 at Sports Hub Tix and SingPost.

Tickets to the Nov 11 show sold out in just 40 minutes on Thursday (May 11) morning, with show promoter AEG announcing ticket sales to his second show on Nov 12.

One listing on Carousell is offering a ticket to the Nov 11 show for $850, while another listing is selling a pair of tickets to the same show for $1,500. Yet another listing is asking for $1,000 for a pair of tickets.

Users reacted angrily to the prices, scolding the sellers for scalping them. However, there were also several listings made by buyers looking to buy tickets to the show for exorbitant prices such as $1,000 per ticket.

The tickets are highly sought after - hundreds of Ed Sheeran fans queued up at the Singapore Indoor Stadium box office from as early as Wednesday (May 10) night to get the tickets, which went on sale at 10am on Thursday.

 
 

Carousell seller saltedpepper created a listing just to warn other users against scammers who allegedly fail to deliver the tickets after the funds are transferred to them. The user, who gave her name as Lydia, cautioned buyers to trust sellers who advertise only meet-ups for ticket sales.

Asked if she had been scammed herself, the 21-year-old student said she had not fallen prey to the scams personally, but "scam tricks like these are common on Carousell".

"As a frequent Carousell user, you know something is not right when you view such a post," she told The Straits Times. "So I'm here just to warn the others as I'm sure all of us are using our hard-earned money to buy our favourite artists' concert tickets."

A notice on Sports Hub's website says the resale of tickets at any price in excess of the initial purchase price is prohibited. 

"Unlawful resale (or attempted unlawful resale) of a ticket would lead to seizure or cancellation of that ticket without refund or other compensation," says the notice.

It is not the first time that scalpers have sold tickets on Carousell at jacked-up prices or even scammed others on the platform.

In March, two men were arrested for their alleged involvement in Coldplay concert ticket scams conducted on Carousell. They had allegedly instructed buyers to transfer money to their bank accounts, but failed to deliver the tickets and could not be contacted after.

If found guilty of cheating, the pair can be jailed for up to 10 years and fined.