S'pore structures win global awards

The Sports Hub (above) clinched the Supreme Award for Structural Engineering, and the Victoria Theatre and Concert Hall (below) won the Structural Heritage award.
The Sports Hub (above) clinched the Supreme Award for Structural Engineering, and the Victoria Theatre and Concert Hall won the Structural Heritage award.ST PHOTOS: ALPHONSUS CHERN, JAMIE KOH, MARK CHEONG
The Sports Hub (above) clinched the Supreme Award for Structural Engineering, and the Victoria Theatre and Concert Hall (below) won the Structural Heritage award.
The Sports Hub clinched the Supreme Award for Structural Engineering, and the Victoria Theatre and Concert Hall (above) won the Structural Heritage award.ST PHOTOS: ALPHONSUS CHERN, JAMIE KOH, MARK CHEONG

Two architectural icons here have clinched global awards for structural engineering.

Last Friday, the Singapore Sports Hub and the Victoria Theatre and Concert Hall were conferred awards by the Institution of Structural Engineers in London, which gives out awards yearly to recognise outstanding work in the structural engineering profession worldwide.

The $1.33 billion Sports Hub clinched the top honour - the Supreme Award for Structural Engineering. The Hub includes the National Stadium - a 55,000- seat sports venue featuring a retractable roof and movable seating. It was designed by a joint team from Arup, DP architects and Aecom.

Mr J. Parrish, who was then the lead designer on Arup's Sports Hub team, said the accolade was "well deserved".

"It's a landmark project, and I think it demonstrates the sort of options for designing buildings in the tropics," he said, speaking from Britain to The Sunday Times.

"It's incredibly light and efficient, one of the more sustainable buildings in the world."

DP Architects director Teoh Hai Pin said he was humbled by the award, adding that the design was a balance of function and "structural elegance".

Meanwhile, the Victoria Theatre and Concert Hall won the award for Structural Heritage, for its restoration works.

Dating back to 1855, it reopened last year after a four-year restoration costing $158 million.

The theatre is the oldest performing arts venue here, and has hosted key historical events including the first performance of Singapore's National Anthem in 1958. Work on the complex by engineering firm T.Y. Lin International included restoring the atrium and improving access to the clock tower.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on November 15, 2015, with the headline 'S'pore structures win global awards'. Print Edition | Subscribe