Expansion of Post-Secondary Education Account to support lifelong learning

Minister for Education (Higher Education and Skills) Ong Ye Kung and SG Enable CEO Ku Geok Boon speak with participants of the S2W transition programme at the Enabling Village on Nov 30, 2016.
Minister for Education (Higher Education and Skills) Ong Ye Kung and SG Enable CEO Ku Geok Boon speak with participants of the S2W transition programme at the Enabling Village on Nov 30, 2016.ST PHOTO: MARK CHEONG
Minister for Education (Higher Education and Skills) Ong Ye Kung poses with Muhammad Rizuwan Bin Abdullah, a participant in the first year of the pilot S2W transition programme at the Enabling Village on Nov 30, 2016.
Minister for Education (Higher Education and Skills) Ong Ye Kung poses with Muhammad Rizuwan Bin Abdullah, a participant in the first year of the pilot S2W transition programme at the Enabling Village on Nov 30, 2016.ST PHOTO: MARK CHEONG

SINGAPORE - The Post-Secondary Education Account (PSEA), set up to encourage young Singaporeans to pursue post-secondary studies, will be expanded to include, among others, approved modular and short courses.

Such courses include those offered by tertiary institutions, publicly-funded arts institutions, public agencies and private training providers.

The expansion will support learners who are looking to develop specific skills, without the need to sign up for a course leading to a full qualification.

It reflects the diverse options in skills training, said Education Minister (Higher Education and Skills) Ong Ye Kung on Wednesday (Nov 30).

Mr Ong, who was speaking at an event at the Enabling Village in Lengkok Bahru, said this is a crucial shift as with lifelong learning, Singaporeans will learn in spurts.

In addition, the expansion will include non-MOE-subsidised Continuing Education and Training (CET) full qualification programmes offered by the five polytechnics and Institute of Technical Education, and approved government-subsidised full qualification courses offered by arts institutions, public agencies and private providers.

Currently, the approved courses covered under PSEA include most full-time and part-time full qualification programmes offered by publicly-funded post-secondary institutions, as well as those offered by the Singapore Workforce Skills Qualifications (WSQ) CET Centres and government-supported special education schools.

The PSEA will also be expanded to include approved training courses offered under SG Enable for persons with disabilities from next February.

Many children and young people with special needs will in time have to pick up skills, in order to gain employment, independence and contribute to society, said Mr Ong.

The expansion of courses, which takes into account public feedback, supports Singaporeans' pursuit of skills mastery and lifelong learning.

The PSEA can be used up to the age of 30 before it rolls into an individual's CPF Ordinary Account. Over time, more courses will be added under the PSEA coverage.