One month after GE2015

Winner and losers: Mr Charles Chong’s first Meet-the-People Session at the PAP Punggol East Branch on Sept 14.
Winner and losers: Mr Charles Chong’s first Meet-the-People Session at the PAP Punggol East Branch on Sept 14. ST FILE PHOTO
Winner and losers: Workers’ Party candidate Terence Tan (Marine Parade GRC) giving Mr Ron Tan (Nee Soon GRC) a hug at the Hougang Stadium before the results of their defeat were announced on Polling Day.
Winner and losers: Workers’ Party candidate Terence Tan (Marine Parade GRC) giving Mr Ron Tan (Nee Soon GRC) a hug at the Hougang Stadium before the results of their defeat were announced on Polling Day. ST FILE PHOTO

Cue a reality check, whether winner or loser. For the PAP, it means embracing the nitty-gritty; for the opposition, it's home-truth time.

It has been exactly one month since the Sept 11 General Election, and whatever shock or surprise the results delivered have worn off for many of the political parties.

With the polls firmly behind them, the parties have got back into the swing of things.

The People's Action Party has hit the ground running, setting up a number of new party branches and securing locations for its weekly Meet-the-People Sessions. It seems the party believes that it was the tireless grassroots efforts of the last five years that helped clinch its 69.9 per cent vote-share victory, and 83 out of the 89 seats for elected MPs.

The Workers' Party, the No. 2 player on the scene, is also looking ahead and has moved on from its unexpected disappointment at the ballot box, where it narrowly held on to Aljunied GRC. The party has gone into soul-searching mode, even as it presses on with its plans.

 

Despite not getting its younger members into Parliament, the WP has gone ahead with renewing its leadership ranks, and has held a meeting to appoint some candidates to its top decision-making body.

 

The rest of the opposition camp, meanwhile, have found the results a sufficient wake-up call to reach out to discuss a possible merger or coalition. So far, the National Solidarity Party, People's Power Party, Singaporeans First and Reform Party have met up. Talks are still in the preliminary stage, but party leaders say something needs to be done to give opposition players a better chance at electoral success.

Insight looks at the parties' plans for moving ahead, a month from the general election.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on October 11, 2015, with the headline 'One month after GE2015'. Print Edition | Subscribe