Constitutional Commission on elected presidency completes review, submits report to PM Lee

Chief Justice Sundaresh Menon (right), speaking on the third day of the Constitutional Commission hearing, held at the Supreme Court on April 26.
Chief Justice Sundaresh Menon (right), speaking on the third day of the Constitutional Commission hearing, held at the Supreme Court on April 26. PHOTO: ST FILE

SINGAPORE - The Constitutional Commission formed to review Singapore's elected presidency has completed its review and the report has been delivered to PM Lee Hsien Loong on Wednesday (Aug 17).

"The Commission wishes to thank all contributors for the thought and care put into their submissions and representations. The diversity of views expressed greatly benefited the Commission in its work," it said in a statement released on Wednesday.

The Prime Minister's Office (PMO) said the Government will study the report and will publish it and give its response in due course.

"The Prime Minister would like to thank the Commission's Chairman, Chief Justice Sundaresh Menon, and its other members for the deliberation and care with which they have carried out their tasks," PMO said in a statement.

The Straits Times understands that PM Lee will  address the issue of  elected presidency in his National Day Rally speech on Sunday (Aug 21).

The nine-member commission, led by Chief Justice Sundaresh Menon, was appointed by PM Lee in February to review three aspects of the elected presidency that was instituted in 1991.

In February, it made a public call for submissions on the three areas being studied. These are: the eligibility criteria for candidates; provisions for minority candidates to have a chance of being elected from time to time; and changes to ensure members of the Council of Presidential Advisers have experience in the public and private sectors.

 
 
 

The commission received a little over 100 submissions.

In April and May, 19 groups and individuals gave their views on the proposed changes to the elected presidency at four public hearings held at the Supreme Court auditorium.

Those who spoke included former Cabinet minister S. Dhanabalan, law academics Kevin Tan, Eugene Tan and Jack Lee, researchers Gillian Koh, Mathew Mathews and Loke Hoe Yeong, and former Nominated MP Loo Choon Yong. There were also groups like the Eurasian Association, Maruah and the Association of Women for Action and Research.