Melania Trump hospitalised for kidney procedure

President Trump says first lady Melania is "doing really well" after undergoing a surgical procedure to treat a benign kidney condition.

White House says treatment 'successful, no complications', didn't explain why it's needed

WASHINGTON • United States First Lady Melania Trump underwent a medical procedure on Monday morning to treat what the White House called a "benign kidney condition" and was reported to be recovering without trouble at a military hospital outside the capital.

"The procedure was successful and there were no complications," a White House statement read. "Mrs Trump is at Walter Reed National Military Medical Centre and will likely remain there for the duration of the week. The First Lady looks forward to a full recovery so she can continue her work on behalf of children everywhere."

President Donald Trump spoke with his wife before the procedure and later spoke with the doctor after it was over, according to a White House official.

In the afternoon, Mr Trump flew by helicopter to visit his wife for about an hour before returning to the White House.

"Our great First Lady is doing really well. Will be leaving hospital in two or three days," Mr Trump tweeted yesterday. "Thank you for so much love and support!"

The White House said 48-year-old Mrs Trump underwent an embolisation procedure.

LOOKING FORWARD TO FULL RECOVERY

The procedure was successful and there were no complications. Mrs Trump is at Walter Reed National Military Medical Centre and will likely remain there for the duration of the week. The First Lady looks forward to a full recovery so she can continue her work on behalf of children everywhere.

'' THE WHITE HOUSE

The Johns Hopkins Patients' Guide to Kidney Cancer describes an arterial embolisation as a procedure in which a special sponge-like material is placed into an artery that supplies blood to the kidney.

A thin tube catheter is inserted into a vessel in the leg and into the main vessel feeding the kidney.

Such a procedure would block the blood supply that feeds the kidney and might be used to stop bleeding from a benign tumour or a small aneurysm, or to reverse the growth of such a tumour, according to specialists.

The Johns Hopkins guide says it can also be used to make it easier for a surgeon to remove the kidney but is more frequently used to control symptoms for someone who cannot undergo surgery.

The fact that Mrs Trump will remain in the hospital for the rest of the week was unusual in the most typical cases, according to leading medical experts.

Still, embolisation kills some surrounding healthy kidney tissue, which causes swelling and pain as a patient recovers, so a longer stay could be helpful or necessary, doctors said.

The White House did not explain what led Mrs Trump to seek treatment.

The procedure came just a week after Mrs Trump formally kicked off a public campaign to encourage children to put kindness first in their lives, particularly on social media.

She has generally maintained a low profile during her 16 months as First Lady, focusing primarily on raising her son Barron, 12.

Mrs Trump makes a point of leading a healthy lifestyle. In New York, she has said she would walk with ankle weights and eat seven pieces of fruit every day.

"I live a healthy life, I take care of my skin and my body," she told GQ in 2016. "I'm against Botox, I'm against injections; I think it's damaging your face, damaging your nerves. It's all me. I will age gracefully, as my mum does."

NYTIMES

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on May 16, 2018, with the headline 'Melania Trump hospitalised for kidney procedure'. Print Edition | Subscribe