How the US turned sour on China ties

Years of cooperation became tinged with resentment over Beijing's trade practices and theft of technology

US Vice-President Mike Pence, flanked by Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (left) and Brunei's Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah, faces Chinese President Xi Jinping (back to camera) as they prepare for a group photo at a gala dinner during the Apec summit in P
US Vice-President Mike Pence, flanked by Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (left) and Brunei's Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah, faces Chinese President Xi Jinping (back to camera) as they prepare for a group photo at a gala dinner during the Apec summit in Port Moresby.PHOTO: REUTERS

The Apec summit's historic failure to agree on a statement amid a US-China spat underscored the prevailing narrative in Washington - that the time has come to deal with China as a competitor.

Republicans, Democrats and the business community largely agree that Washington should begin to rectify what they view as economic imbalances in the global economic system arising from China's failure to play by the rules, and to match - if not outright counter - Beijing's push to project power across the globe.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on November 25, 2018, with the headline 'How the US turned sour on China ties'. Subscribe