UK 'slave' woman 'bombarded neighbour with love letters'

Police officers stand outside flats as police conduct house-to-house inquires in the area where three women were rescued in south London, on Saturday, Nov 23, 2013. The youngest of the three women held as 'slaves' for 30 years in London bombarde
Police officers stand outside flats as police conduct house-to-house inquires in the area where three women were rescued in south London, on Saturday, Nov 23, 2013. The youngest of the three women held as 'slaves' for 30 years in London bombarded a male neighbour with love letters and described herself as "like a fly trapped in a web", reports said. -- FILE PHOTO: AP

LONDON (AFP) - The youngest of the three women held as 'slaves' for 30 years in London bombarded a male neighbour with love letters and described herself as "like a fly trapped in a web", reports said.

The 30-year-old woman, named by The Sun newspaper as Rosie, begged for help in the letters but warned the recipient not to confront her "mad and evil" captors.

An Indian man, who police said on Monday was 73 and not 67 as previously thought, and a 67-year-old Tanzanian woman have been arrested and bailed over the case.

Police have said that the two older women - a 57-year-old Irish woman and a Malaysian aged 69 - met the male suspect in the 1970s through a "shared political ideology" and that at one point they had lived together in what officers described as a "collective".

"Rosie", whom police believe was born in captivity, slipped 500 written notes to her neighbour Marius Feneck, a 26-year-old welder, over eight years, The Sun reported.

She pleaded for help, but also urged him not to try to help her and said: "These monsters here are mad and evil and racist."

The report said she had become infatuated with Feneck and described his girlfriend, who lived with him in the same block of flats in Brixton in south London, as "vermin".

Detectives have said that although they do not believe the three women were subjected to sexual abuse, they were kept in "invisible handcuffs" through psychological terror.

Another report said on Monday that police had identified 13 addresses in London linked to the couple, suggesting that the victims were moved around several times over the last three decades.

London's Metropolitan Police said it had no comment on the reports.

Home Secretary Theresa May said on Sunday that tackling modern slavery in Britain was a "personal priority" and that other victims were "hidden in plain sight".