The ISIS files

(Left) One of the land leases which the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria had stolen from members of religious groups it chased out. (Far left) Paperwork littering Mosul's bombed-out Ministry of Agriculture last September.
Paperwork littering Mosul's bombed-out Ministry of Agriculture last September.PHOTOS: NYTIMES
(Left) One of the land leases which the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria had stolen from members of religious groups it chased out. (Far left) Paperwork littering Mosul's bombed-out Ministry of Agriculture last September.
One of the land leases which the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria had stolen from members of religious groups it chased out. PHOTOS: NYTIMES
(Left) One of the land leases which the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria had stolen from members of religious groups it chased out. (Far left) Paperwork littering Mosul's bombed-out Ministry of Agriculture last September.
MR MUHAMMAD NASSER HAMOUD.

On five trips to battle-scarred Iraq, journalists for The New York Times scoured old ISIS offices, gathering thousands of files abandoned by the militants as their 'caliphate' crumbled. Here is what they discovered.

MOSUL • Weeks after the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) seized Mosul in June 2014, as fighters roamed the streets and religious extremists rewrote the laws, an order rang out from the loudspeakers of local mosques.

Public servants, the speakers blared, were to report to their former offices.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on April 08, 2018, with the headline 'The ISIS files'. Print Edition | Subscribe