Fending off foreign threats: How 6 countries are working to curb interference in national politics

From viral influence campaigns on social media to political donations and state-sponsored cyber attacks, there is much alarm over the phenomenon of foreign interference in national politics. The Straits Times bureaus look at the mix of efforts across the world to curb the growing menace.

Protesters taking a stand against President Donald Trump in front of the US Capitol building during a "People's Rally for Impeachment" late last month. PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE
Protesters taking a stand against President Donald Trump in front of the US Capitol building during a "People's Rally for Impeachment" late last month. PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE
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Since the 2016 election, America has become familiar with the threat of foreign interference in the form of social media agitation by established troll factories overseas and state-sponsored cyber attacks that favour one candidate over another.

But recent events have forced the Washington establishment to grapple with a fresher question: whether asking another country to dig up dirt on a political rival constitutes a request for foreign interference, which would be illegal.

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