Science Talk

Extreme weather events a new normal?

Climate change is leading to a future of unprecedented risks, but much can be done to tackle them

Flooded homes on the outskirts of Lumberton, North Carolina, on Monday. Hurricane Florence was downgraded to Category 1 when it ploughed ashore last Friday, but its sluggish pace resulted in record-breaking rainfall totals.
Hurricane Florence: Flooded homes on the outskirts of Lumberton, North Carolina, on Monday. Hurricane Florence was downgraded to Category 1 when it ploughed ashore last Friday, but its sluggish pace resulted in record-breaking rainfall totals.PHOTO: REUTERS
Windows of a Hong Kong commercial building were smashed over the weekend during Typhoon Mangkhut, one of the most powerful storms to hit the region in decades.
Typhoon Mangkhut: Windows of a Hong Kong commercial building were smashed over the weekend during Typhoon Mangkhut, one of the most powerful storms to hit the region in decades.PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

The year 2018 has been marked by extreme weather, with widespread impact on public safety, transport, energy and health around the world.

This year began with a major winter storm hitting the United States Atlantic coast in early January, battering coastal areas with heavy snow, blizzards and strong winds.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 20, 2018, with the headline 'Extreme weather events a new normal?'. Subscribe