Fidget spinners recalled from UK shelves over safety fears

Hundreds of fidget spinners have been taken off the shelves at supermarkets and stores in the United Kingdom due to safety concerns since it became increasingly popular with children and youth in recent months.
Hundreds of fidget spinners have been taken off the shelves at supermarkets and stores in the United Kingdom due to safety concerns since it became increasingly popular with children and youth in recent months.PHOTO: AFP/GETTY IMAGES

BATH, UNITED KINGDOM - Hundreds of fidget spinners have been taken off the shelves at supermarkets and stores in the United Kingdom due to safety concerns.

Nearly 300 of the toys were seized in Bath by the Bath & North East Somerset Council.

According to a statement on the Council's website, some of these spinners had small parts that could easily pop out, causing a choking hazard to young children. Others featured a blade with sharp pointed edges, and still others had LED lights containing lithium-ion batteries which, if ingested, can cause internal bleeding.

Councillor Martin Veal said in the statement: "Fidget spinners are new and currently very popular among young people. We want to ensure that when using these devices that young people are safe."

The council found that in most cases, no safety warnings or minimum age restrictions were indicated on the fidget spinners.

In addition, the details of the manufacturers and importers of the spinners were not provided on the products. The council said these were important for enabling the fidget spinners to be swiftly withdrawn from the market in the event of a product safety issue.

 

Councillor Veal added: "Anyone buying a fidget spinner should purchase it from a reputable trader and ensure the safety warnings can be clearly seen on the packaging."

Along with fidget cubes, fidget spinners were initially meant to benefit people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. They have become increasingly popular with children and youth in recent months.

Spinners in Singapore cost from $10 each for a plastic model to more than $100 for a metal version with premium bearings.