Bomb detonates on Northern Ireland border

Concerns have grown that the possible return of a hard border between British-ruled Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland after Brexit could increase security tensions in the once war-torn province.
Concerns have grown that the possible return of a hard border between British-ruled Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland after Brexit could increase security tensions in the once war-torn province.PHOTO: AFP

LONDON (AFP) - An explosive device described as an attempted trap for security forces detonated in a village on the Northern Ireland border on Monday (Aug 19), but failed to injure anyone.

Police and bomb disposal experts had been working in the area of Newtownbutler over the weekend since receiving an initial report about a suspect device on Saturday.

"I am of the firm belief this was a deliberate attempt to lure police and ATO (Anti-Terrorism Officer) colleagues into the area to murder them," Stephen Martin from the Police Service of Northern Ireland said in a statement.

Martin later told reporters that two Irish republican dissident groups, the New IRA and the Continuity IRA, "would be a very good starting point for the investigation".

He added: "It's fair to say their level of activity has increased this year."

Concerns have grown that the possible return of a hard border between British-ruled Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland after Brexit could increase security tensions in the once war-torn province.

Martin said violent attacks had grown in recent months, calling on politicians to take action to heal enduring divisions in society.

 
 
 

"Terrorism of this nature is a societal problem," he said.

"We shouldn't take our peace for granted."

Three decades of conflict known as "the Troubles", in which more than 3,500 people were killed, largely ended in Northern Ireland with the 1998 Good Friday Agreement.

Violent incidents have continued, however.

In April, a journalist was shot dead by Irish republican dissidents during rioting in Londonderry.

"I strongly condemn the cowardly actions of those responsible for this bomb attack, which could have had devastating consequences," Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar said in a statement.

"There is never any justification to use violence to achieve political aims," he said.