I will be PM to take Britain out of EU, says UK's Theresa May

Mrs Theresa May could face a confidence vote if she loses the vote on her Brexit deal in Parliament on Dec 11.
Mrs Theresa May could face a confidence vote if she loses the vote on her Brexit deal in Parliament on Dec 11.PHOTO: REUTERS

BUENOS AIRES (REUTERS) - Mrs Theresa May said on Saturday (Dec 1) she would be the Prime Minister to take Britain out of the European Union and that Parliament should back her Brexit deal to ensure certainty for the future.

Mrs May sealed a deal with EU leaders last Sunday that would see Britain leave the bloc on March 29 with continued close ties, but the odds look stacked against her getting it approved by a deeply divided British Parliament in a vote on Dec 11.

The deal has been criticised by many of Mrs May's Conservative lawmakers, both supporters of a cleaner break with the EU and those who want to keep closer ties. Opposition parties and a small Northern Irish party which props up Mrs May's minority government have also said they plan to reject the deal.

Several of her ministers have resigned in protest at the deal, and some of her lawmakers have called for a confidence vote in her leadership, something some believe could happen if she loses the vote in Parliament.

"There is a lot more for me still to do, not least delivering on Brexit and being the prime minister that does take the United Kingdom out of the European Union," Mrs May told a news conference at the G-20 Summit in Argentina, when asked what her legacy would be if she is forced to quit.

"I will be talking with Members of Parliament... and explaining why passing this deal in the vote that will take place in the House of Commons will take us to certainty for the future, and that failure to do that would only lead to uncertainty."

Mrs May said that during a series of bilateral meetings with world leaders at the summit, she had updated them on the Brexit deal and told them it would be a good deal for the global economy as well as international firms which have invested in Britain or that use European bases to supply the UK market.

 

"That this deal sets a path for the UK to a brighter future has been affirmed by the discussions I have had on trade over the past two days," she said.

"Friends and partners have made clear that they are keen to sign and implement ambitious free trade agreements with us as soon as possible," she added.