Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crash: Fresh details emerge with cockpit voice download

A source who has listened to the air traffic control recording of the Ethiopian Airline's Boeing 737 Max before it crashed told Reuters the pilot, can be heard saying the plane was having flight control problems before it crashed.
A flower memorial with portraits of some of the 157 victims of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 at Hama Quntushele village near Bishoftu in the Oromia region. One source who has listened to the air traffic control recording said a voice from the Boeing
A flower memorial with portraits of some of the 157 victims of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 at Hama Quntushele village near Bishoftu in the Oromia region. One source who has listened to the air traffic control recording said a voice from the Boeing 737 Max 8 cockpit requested to climb to 14,000 feet (4,267m) above sea level before urgently asking to return.PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

Max 8 jet had unusually high speed after take-off before crew reported problems: Source

ADDIS ABABA/PARIS • The hunt for the cause of an Ethiopian Airlines plane crash that killed all 157 people on board gathered pace on Saturday when investigators successfully downloaded the cockpit voice recorder and fresh details emerged of the final seconds of the flight.

While experts say it is too soon to know what brought down the Boeing 737 Max 8 on March 10, aviation authorities worldwide have grounded Boeing's 737 Max jets, as concerns over the plane caused the company's share price to tumble.

In Addis Ababa, a source who has listened to the air traffic control recording of the plane's communications said Flight 302 had an unusually high speed after take-off before the crew reported problems and asked permission to climb quickly.

A voice from the cockpit requested to climb to 14,000 feet (4,267m) above sea level - about 6,400 feet above the airport - before urgently asking to return, the source told Reuters on condition of anonymity because the recording is part of an ongoing investigation.

The plane vanished from radar at 10,800 feet.

"He said he had a flight control problem. That is why he wanted to climb," the source said, adding that there were no further details of the exact problem and the voice sounded nervous.

Experts say pilots typically ask to climb when experiencing problems near the ground in order to gain margin for manoeuvre and avoid any difficult terrain. Addis Ababa is surrounded by hills and, immediately to the north, the Entoto Mountains.

CONSIDERABLE AMOUNT OF TIME

We are waiting for the results. We are making all the necessary efforts to identify the cause of the accident. This kind of investigation needs considerable amount of time to reach concrete conclusions.

'' ETHIOPIAN MINISTER OF TRANSPORT DAGMAWIT MOGES

In Paris, France's BEA air accident investigation agency said data from the jet's cockpit voice recorder has been successfully downloaded. The French agency said in a tweet it had not listened to the audio files and that the data had been transferred to Ethiopian investigators.

The BEA also issued a photo showing the recorder intact but dented by the impact of the plane's crash into a field minutes after take-off from Addis Ababa.

"We are waiting for the results. We are making all the necessary efforts to identify the cause of the accident," Ethiopian Minister of Transport Dagmawit Moges told reporters in Addis Ababa.

"This kind of investigation needs considerable amount of time to reach concrete conclusions".

The Ethiopian carrier said DNA testing of the remains of the people on board may take up to six months, and it offered bereaved families charred earth from the crash site to bury. The passengers were from more than 30 nations.

Ms Dagmawit said temporary death certificates had been given, and the final ones would be issued in two weeks. Collection of DNA samples from relatives had begun.

Victim identification would be done to scientific international standards, and internationally recognised groups such as Interpol would be involved, she said.

As families await results from the investigation, the airline was scheduled to hold a service yesterday in Addis Ababa, at the Kidist Selassie, or Holy Trinity Cathedral, where many of Ethiopia's past rulers are buried under its pink stone spires.

"We were told by the company that we will be given a kilo (of earth) each for burial at Selassie church for a funeral they will organise," said one family member who asked not to be named.

Around 100 relatives, including the brother and father of pilot Yared Getachew, gathered at a memorial for the victims at the Kenyan embassy.

"His dream was to be a pilot," said Mr Meno Getachew Tessema, Mr Yared's brother. "He was diligent, hardworking, he had a consistent work ethic. I would like to emphasise his record and that he was a rising star at Ethiopian Airlines."

Flight data has already indicated some similarities with a crash involving the same model of plane during a Lion Air flight last October. All 189 people on board were killed. Both planes crashed within minutes of take-off after the pilots reported problems.

The grounding of the 737 Max jets has had no immediate financial impact on airlines using the planes, but it will get painful for the industry the longer they do not fly, analysts said last Friday.

Boeing plans to release upgraded software for the 737 Max in a week to 10 days, sources familiar with the matter said. The US planemaker has been working on a software upgrade for an anti-stall system and pilot displays on its fastest-selling jetliner in the wake of the Lion Air crash.

REUTERS

SEE OPINION

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 18, 2019, with the headline 'Fresh details emerge with cockpit voice download '. Print Edition | Subscribe