The age of artificial intelligence: Making driving safer for disabled, elderly in Seoul

KT Corporation employees testing the company's 5G Remote Cockpit, a remote control system for autonomous vehicles. South Korean YouTuber We Park, who is paralysed from the waist down, driving an autonomous car at K-City, in Hwaseong city. Powered by
South Korean YouTuber We Park, who is paralysed from the waist down, driving an autonomous car at K-City, in Hwaseong city. Powered by AI over 5G mobile connections that were launched in South Korea in April, self-driving cars have the potential to benefit those with disabilities.ST PHOTO: CHANG MAY CHOON
KT Corporation employees testing the company's 5G Remote Cockpit, a remote control system for autonomous vehicles. South Korean YouTuber We Park, who is paralysed from the waist down, driving an autonomous car at K-City, in Hwaseong city. Powered by
KT Corporation employees testing the company's 5G Remote Cockpit, a remote control system for autonomous vehicles. PHOTO: KT CORPORATION

South Korean YouTuber We Park could barely contain his excitement as he got behind the wheels of an autonomous car for the first time.

"Look, no hands!" he exclaimed, as the car moved itself in K-City, a town built to test such vehicles and said to be the largest of its kind in the world.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on August 11, 2019, with the headline 'Making driving safer for disabled, elderly'. Print Edition | Subscribe