Tennis: Third seed Pliskova into Wimbledon last 16, Zhang joins her as Wozniacki claims Hawk-Eye 'black spot'

Czech Republic's Karolina Pliskova (left) and China's Zhang Shuai won their matches at the Wimbledon and will make it into the fourth round of the competition.
Czech Republic's Karolina Pliskova (left) and China's Zhang Shuai won their matches at the Wimbledon and will make it into the fourth round of the competition.PHOTOS: AFP

LONDON (AFP) - Czech third seed Karolina Pliskova reached the Wimbledon fourth round for the second successive year on Friday (July 5), with a 6-3, 2-6, 6-4 win over Chinese Taipei's Hsieh Su-wei.

She fired 14 aces and 42 winners in her Court One victory and will face either Anett Kontaveit, the 20th seed from Estonia, or fellow Czech Karolina Muchova for a place in the quarter-finals.

Earlier, China's Zhang Shuai made the Wimbledon fourth round for the first time, coming back from 0-4 down in the opening set to beat former world No. 1 Caroline Wozniacki, who failed to see eye-to-eye with the Hawk-Eye line-call review system.

Zhang, the world No. 60, is the first Chinese woman since Peng Shuai in 2015 to reach the second week at the All England Club thanks to her 6-4, 6-2 win over the 14th-seeded Dane.

Before this year, the 30-year-old had never won a main-draw match at Wimbledon in five attempts.

It was a record which reflected her previous struggles - she was 0-14 at the Slams until she broke through to the 2016 Australian Open quarter-finals.

On Friday, she fired 26 winners against just eight for Wozniacki and goes on to face either Viktorija Golubic of Switzerland or Ukraine's Dayana Yastremska.

 
 
 
 

Wozniacki, the 2018 Australian Open champion, has never made it past the fourth round at Wimbledon.

Her affection for the tournament would not have been helped by her unhappiness at what she claimed to be a number of poor calls by the Hawk-Eye review system.

"You trust that it tells you the right thing. Sometimes you do see the balls a little differently than what the Hawk-Eye is," said the 28-year-old.

"At least you know, okay, you can get it out of your mind. I do believe that it was not in the ideal place today."

Recently married Wozniacki said that even the umpire believed there may have been a problem with the technology.

"He saw it differently and the linesmen saw it differently, as well. But then again, there's nothing you can do about it. It is what it is."

The umpire, she claimed, offered to get it looked at - for the next match on Court Two.

"Well, I don't have a next match," she grumbled.