Coronavirus pandemic

Stay-home order test for Berthier

Amita Berthier using the treadmill to keep her fitness level up while serving a stay-home notice since Wednesday. PHOTO COURTESY OF AMITA BERTHIER
Amita Berthier using the treadmill to keep her fitness level up while serving a stay-home notice since Wednesday. PHOTO COURTESY OF AMITA BERTHIER

Restless fencer, spending 14 days at home, trains and stays positive after Olympic delay

For someone used to training five times a week, being stuck indoors for two weeks with her older brother Ashok is not the kind of sparring national fencer Amita Berthier had in mind when she mentions she is "itching to fence".

However, that is the situation the 19-year-old finds herself in as the pair serve a 14-day stay-home notice (SHN) after returning from the United States on Wednesday.

Berthier had been training at the Bluegrass Fencers' Club in Lexington, Kentucky, since last June after taking a gap year from her studies at the University of Notre Dame to focus on qualifying for the 2020 Olympics.

However, when the club closed indefinitely on Monday as part of measures to curb the spread of the coronavirus, she decided to return home with Ashok, 30, who works in New York as a financial analyst.

Berthier, who was the first Singaporean fencer to win a Junior World Cup title at the Havana leg in Cuba in 2017, said: "With the Olympics also postponed to next year, and the fencing club closed, I thought it would be best to come back to Singapore."

She added that Lexington is "a ghost town", with grocery stores and medical facilities the only places that are open.

"Many athletes are disappointed to not be able to train and spar, but we understand the measures are necessary because we don't want to be in a position where we could harm ourselves or others.

"I see this as a test of how strong we are and how we are able to adapt to changes," added the fencer, who has won three golds at the SEA Games and a team bronze at the 2018 Asian Games.

She has set up a mini gym that includes a treadmill and weights in the living room of a relative's vacant apartment, where she is staying.

She also keeps herself occupied by practising her footwork, shadow fencing and watching fencing videos online.

The world No. 59 women's foil fencer said: "Our sport revolves around sparring, so not being able to do so is really tough and we worry about how to keep our fencing stamina up.

STAYING CONNECTED

My teammates and I try to motivate each other through text messages, and we have had FaceTime workout sessions together.

AMITA BERTHIER, Singapore fencer, on serving a two-week stay-home notice.

"It's normal that people are distraught that their lives have been disrupted, but we also have to realise that our Government and many other people are doing their best to help us get through these tough times.

"My teammates and I try to motivate each other through text messages, and we have had FaceTime workout sessions together. And if Z Fencing (an academy she used to train at) is open after my stay-home notice ends, I will also go there to train."

Berthier will make use of this lull period to map out her path to next year's Games. She hopes to resume her studies when the new semester starts in August.

She added: "We were so close to the Asian Olympic qualifiers that would be held in South Korea in April. But now, there is a lot of uncertainty about the schedule. We just have to try and remain calm and stay positive. I know I have to be ready any time we are called upon to compete again."

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 27, 2020, with the headline 'Stay-home order test for Berthier'. Print Edition | Subscribe