Paralympics ban upheld

Performers carry the Russian flag at the closing ceremony of the 2014 Paralympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia. Russia's appeal against the ban for the Rio Paralympics failed when the Court of Arbitration for Sport turned down the appeal yesterday.
Russia’s Aleksey Ashapatov, who competes in the throwing events, training at the Yunost sports ground in Sochi. The four-time Paralympics champion would have been Russia’s flag-bearer in Rio next month if the ban was overturned. PHOTO: REUTERS
Russia's Aleksey Ashapatov, who competes in the throwing events, training at the Yunost sports ground in Sochi. The four-time Paralympics champion would have been Russia's flag-bearer in Rio next month if the ban was overturned.
Performers carry the Russian flag at the closing ceremony of the 2014 Paralympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia. Russia’s appeal against the ban for the Rio Paralympics failed when the Court of Arbitration for Sport turned down the appeal yesterday.PHOTO: REUTERS

Court turns down Russian appeal against suspension as Germany applauds zero-tolerance stance

GENEVA • Russian competitors remained banned from next month's Rio Paralympics, after the country lost an appeal yesterday against a suspension issued over a vast state-run doping programme.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) dismissed the appeal filed by the Russian Paralympic Committee, which sought to overturn the Aug 7 ban by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC).

The IPC took the tough action after the release of a bombshell report commissioned by the World Anti-Doping Agency (Wada), detailing drug-cheating directed by government officials and affecting dozens of sports.

Citing evidence compiled by Wada lead investigator Richard McLaren, the IPC argued that Russia's disabled athletes had failed to comply with global anti-doping codes.

The Lausanne-based CAS said Russia in its appeal "did not file any evidence contradicting the facts on which the IPC decision was based".

In a statement, the court "confirmed" Russia's ban from the Rio Paralympics, which run from Sept 7 to 18.

  • 267

    Places at next month's Paralympics which had been secured by Russian athletes. They will be re-distributed.

The IPC said the 267 places secured by Russian athletes would now be re-distributed to other nations.

Russian officials had voiced confidence of a victory at CAS and immediately took issue with yesterday's ruling.

Sports Minister Vitaly Mutko, a central figure in the McLaren report, blasted the CAS decision as "more political than legal".

"The decision is not in the legal domain," Tass news agency quoted Mutko as saying. "There was no reason for rejection but it happened."

However, IPC president Philip Craven said the decision "underlines our strong belief that doping has absolutely no place in Paralympic sport, and further improves our ability to ensure fair competition and a level playing field for all para athletes around the world."

The decision was applauded by Friedhelm Julius Beucher, the president of Germany's National Paralympic Committee.

"The judgment is a sign of consistent zero tolerance on doping," he said. "Exclusions are always tragic, but there are rules in sport and anyone who doesn't follow them gets shown a red card."

The Paralympics ban was the latest blow to Russian sport, which has been condemned by a mountain of doping allegations in recent months. The country narrowly escaped an outright International Olympic Committee ban from the just-concluded Rio Games, but still saw dozens of its athletes barred, including the majority of their track and field team.

Russia continues to deny the findings of the McLaren report, including the involvement of the sports ministry and the Russian secret service in doping fraud at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics.

Russian Paralympic Committee president Vladimir Lukin had sought to portray his athletes as independent from the Moscow government.

But the IPC said it did not believe that disabled Olympic hopefuls were untouched by the pervasive cheating in the country.

Craven said previously that Russia's "thirst for glory at all costs has severely damaged the integrity and image of all sport" and "their medals-over-morals attitude disgusts me".

Russia can now appeal to the Swiss Federal Court although it can only overturn the CAS ruling on the basis of a procedural mistake and not on the merits of the case.

AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE, REUTERS

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 24, 2016, with the headline 'Paralympics ban upheld'. Print Edition | Subscribe