Men's Health Urbanathlon to set new barriers in this year's edition

Road warriors in last year's Men's Health Urbanathlon tackling the Network, climbing up the rope web and then descending feet first while avoiding getting caught in the net, a task obviously tougher than corporate networking.  Singapore runner Anne Q
Road warriors in last year's Men's Health Urbanathlon tackling the Network, climbing up the rope web and then descending feet first while avoiding getting caught in the net, a task obviously tougher than corporate networking. Singapore runner Anne Qi Hui says endurance, speed and focus are required to finish the Urbanathlon.PHOTO: MEN'S HEALTH
Road warriors in last year's Men's Health Urbanathlon tackling the Network, climbing up the rope web and then descending feet first while avoiding getting caught in the net, a task obviously tougher than corporate networking.  Singapore runner Anne Q
Road warriors in last year's Men's Health Urbanathlon tackling the Network, climbing up the rope web and then descending feet first while avoiding getting caught in the net, a task obviously tougher than corporate networking. Singapore runner Anne Qi Hui says endurance, speed and focus are required to finish the Urbanathlon.PHOTO: MEN'S HEALTH

Feared monkey bars gone but 5 new obstacles plus surprise challenge now

Contestants at this year's Men's Health Urbanathlon will be pushed to their limits once more with five new obstacles and a mystery challenge.

Pang Lee Cheng, general manager of Singapore Press Holdings (SPH) Magazines, said: "The Men's Health Urbanathlon has grown from strength to strength in the last five years.

"This year's edition promises to be our toughest ever, and should provide a thrilling challenge for Singapore runners."

While the dreaded uphill monkey bars is missing from the March2 race, new obstacles like the Wire House - a 4m-long web of bungee cords - and Peaks and Troughs - 3m-high sloping structures - mean there is no respite for racers. Adding to the intrigue is the mystery challenge, which will be revealed only on race day.

Last year's race saw 3,000 contestants overcome nine gruelling obstacles over 14km. It was also the first time the Urbanathlon opened its doors to female participants, with some 300 taking part.

Registration for the race, jointly organised by SPH Magazines and HiVelocity and once again open to women, has already exceeded last year's figures.

Said Kelvin Tan, editor of Men's Health: "We have already exceeded the 3,000 number of participants from last year's race.

"However, we are keeping registrations open till this Friday so that even more running enthusiasts can join us and experience for themselves how memorable the Urbanathlon is."

Back for more is Singapore runner Anne Qi Hui, who finished in 1hr 8min 57sec last year.

The 33-year-old said: "The race tends to bring out the best in me. Endurance, speed and focus are required to finish the race, and it is important to use the right strategy for each obstacle.

"Of course, it's important to have fun at the same time."

Joining Qi are Singapore's "Blade Runner" Shariff Abdullah, and the seven-member Team Singapura Everest, who are aiming to scale Mount Everest next year.

Hiwan Idus, member of Team Singapura Everest, said: "We are confident that our training for Everest will put us in good stead for the Urbanathlon."

Interested runners can sign up at http://urbanathlon.menshealth.com.sg/2014/. Registration closes on Friday.

Registration fees are priced at $128, and each participant will receive a race pack worth over $400.

siangyee@sph.com.sg