OCBC Cycle: Introducing a nutritious alternative to aid recovery

SSI senior sport dietitian Richard Swinbourne (second from right) and national cyclist Serene Lee (right) at the cooking demonstration at the OCBC Cycle Cook-Off workshop yesterday.
SSI senior sport dietitian Richard Swinbourne (second from right) and national cyclist Serene Lee (right) at the cooking demonstration at the OCBC Cycle Cook-Off workshop yesterday.ST PHOTO: CHEW SENG KIM

Graphic designer Christine Lim's remedy after a workout usually consists of lots of water or an isotonic beverage.

At yesterday's OCBC Cycle Cook-Off workshop, which was themed around post-exercise recovery, the 39-year-old was introduced to another option: a banana-spinach-coconut smoothie.

The drink was one of two items prepared by the 16 people who participated in the workshop at the Singapore Sports Institute, part of the lead-up activities ahead of the Nov 18-19 OCBC Cycle.

Last week, Lim completed the final session of OCBC Cycle's Project Training Wheels, the event's learn-to-ride programme.

She has been cycling with a group of 14 in preparation for the OCBC Cycle's The Straits Times Ride category, a 23km route which starts and ends at the Singapore Sports Hub.

Lim was impressed by what she learnt from SSI's dietitians and national cyclist Serene Lee.

"It was quite enriching, and important for cyclists who want to learn more about replenishing nutrients," Lim said.

"Sometimes we have team members who develop leg cramps after cycling and they say just taking an isotonic drink will do.

"I think this smoothie is more natural and healthy, so I'll definitely share the recipe with my team members."

Seeing the SSI team demonstrate a spaghetti dish coated with a green sauce made of blended broccoli was also informative, said Iman Iskandar, 43.

Iman, who works in IT and cycles to and from his office in Tanjong Pagar and his Bedok home every day, added: "I only know how to cook vegetables separately from rice, and now I've learnt I can mix both together - it's much more fun."

The key was to show how simple it is to create such meals, said SSI senior sport dietitian Richard Swinbourne.

He added: "The recipes were very easy - both five-ingredient recipes from Jamie Oliver's latest book. They're very accessible, even with limited cooking facilities.

"(The participants) had a lot of fun ... there was a lot of smiling and a lot of pride in the way that they plated it up."

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on October 08, 2017, with the headline 'Introducing a nutritious alternative to aid recovery'. Print Edition | Subscribe