FAS: Grooming a new breed of Lions

Above: Hariss Harun, who is well known for his work ethic, training with the Singapore team ahead of this week's 2022 World Cup qualifiers. ST PHOTO: GIN TAY Left: Gabriel Quak squaring off with Indonesia's Putu Gede at last year's AFF Championship.
Above: Hariss Harun, who is well known for his work ethic, training with the Singapore team ahead of this week's 2022 World Cup qualifiers. ST PHOTO: GIN TAY
Above: Hariss Harun, who is well known for his work ethic, training with the Singapore team ahead of this week's 2022 World Cup qualifiers. ST PHOTO: GIN TAY Left: Gabriel Quak squaring off with Indonesia's Putu Gede at last year's AFF Championship.
Above: Gabriel Quak squaring off with Indonesia's Putu Gede at last year's AFF Championship. He is one of two Chinese in the current national squad. ST FILE PHOTO

The Football Association of Singapore revealed recently its goal to qualify for the 2034 World Cup. But can the country produce the players to achieve this? The Straits Times speaks to experts and insiders on what is needed to make the dream a reality. - Proper structure, NS policy, need for more Chinese and mindset change among issues

Some years ago, I watched a Schools National B Division football final at the Jalan Besar Stadium alongside the then national Under-16 coach.

Noticing Chinese players featured heavily in both finalists' teams, I asked the coach why his squad of 18, which had played in the Lion City Cup a month earlier, had only one.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 02, 2019, with the headline 'Grooming a new breed of Lions'. Print Edition | Subscribe