Chinese footballers off to boot camp

The Shanghai Shenhua U-19 football team marching, as a soldier looks on during a military-style training session at the team's training ground in Shanghai last week. Shenhua and China's national squad have sent young players off for military drills a
The Shanghai Shenhua U-19 football team marching, as a soldier looks on during a military-style training session at the team's training ground in Shanghai last week. Shenhua and China's national squad have sent young players off for military drills and "thought education" as part of a wider campaign to promote Communist Party values.PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

U-25, U-19 players undergo army drills, 'thought education' to improve national team

SHANGHAI • Chinese national squads and a top league team have packed young footballers off to military camps for drills and Marxist-style "thought education" as a campaign to promote Communist Party values spreads even into the sporting world.

Chinese fans have watched the militarisation of football with a mixture of anger and bemusement, after pictures emerged of players getting their hair shaved and throwing themselves bare-chested into snow.

The Chinese Football Association (CFA) spirited away more than 50 Under-25 national squad players in October for several weeks of intensive army drills, swopping their football boots for combat boots and military fatigues.

The move, underlining desperation to improve the perennially under-achieving Chinese national side, was particularly controversial because it meant some of China's finest young players were not involved in the final games of the league season.

A second batch of players was packed off early last month and this week, a national squad of U-19s was set to don camouflage and head to the barracks, suggesting that the boot camps may become a fixture.

Chinese Super League (CSL) side Shanghai Shenhua followed suit with its U-19 players, combining football training with marching and other aspects of a military life.

Under the watchful eye of the drillmasters of airforce unit 94778, the young players were subjected last week to "thought education", the club said on China's Twitter-like Weibo platform.

They "examined propaganda materials, visited the unit's hall of history, soldiers' barracks and took part in basic military formation drills", it added.

The players were also plonked down to watch the evening news on state television - a nightly hymn to the Communist Party - before hitting their bunks.

The CFA has been characteristically coy on the thinking behind the boot camps, but the Beijing Evening News said: "In several previous warm-up matches, some of the national team were criticised for not working hard and having no sense of honour."

The Beijing Youth Daily, citing the CFA, said that the camps will "strengthen young players' ideology".

Chinese President Xi Jinping has conducted a broad campaign to bolster the ruling Communist Party that has drawn comparisons to past mass political campaigns under former leader Mao Zedong.

Government departments, businesses and organisations across the country have signed up to the drive by conducting indoctrination sessions focusing on Marxist values and "Xi Jinping Thought".

Earlier this year, national team players began appearing in matches with bandages covering their tattoos, which the Xi government frowns upon.

Frustrated Chinese fans have accused the CFA of putting politics before football as it took dozens of players out of action for the critical last few games of the season.

Pictures subsequently emerged online of the U-25 players with buzz cuts and wearing military garb as they sat in a whitewashed room watching the senior national team's 0-0 draw with India on television.

A red banner at the front of the room exhorted them to be upstanding members of the public.

China's World Cup-winning coach Marcello Lippi has not commented on the initiative.

As part of Mr Xi's efforts to make the country a footballing powerhouse, China made the 70-year-old Italian one of the best-paid coaches in the world when it hired him in 2016.

But, after an initial bounce, the team have won just once in their last five games and are stewing in 76th in the Fifa rankings.

AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on December 02, 2018, with the headline 'Chinese footballers off to boot camp'. Print Edition | Subscribe