An eye-opening partnership: Geylang International and Japan's Yamaga

Attention to detail a key driver of football in Japan, a trait Geylang can replicate in S'pore

Noor Ali and Anders Aplin have been a part of Japan's J2 League club Matsumoto Yamaga FC, and hope to take what they have learnt back home to help raise Singapore football.
From top: Anders Aplin, on loan from Geylang International, winding down in Matsumoto Yamaga's dormitory that he shares with the club's youth players. The room has been home for the Singapore international for the last four months. Aplin taking a pho
Anders Aplin, on loan from Geylang International, winding down in Matsumoto Yamaga's dormitory that he shares with the club's youth players. The room has been home for the Singapore international for the last four months. ST PHOTO: SHAMIR OSMAN
From top: Anders Aplin, on loan from Geylang International, winding down in Matsumoto Yamaga's dormitory that he shares with the club's youth players. The room has been home for the Singapore international for the last four months. Aplin taking a pho
Aplin taking a photo with a Yamaga fan during the club's Singapore Day at the Alwin Stadium, where local favourites like kaya toast and bak kut teh were on sale, as well as Geylang jerseys. ST PHOTO: SHAMIR OSMAN
From top: Anders Aplin, on loan from Geylang International, winding down in Matsumoto Yamaga's dormitory that he shares with the club's youth players. The room has been home for the Singapore international for the last four months. Aplin taking a pho
Noor Ali ends his 10-month stint as Yamaga's U-18 B team head coach by celebrating the senior team's J2 league victory and promotion into Japan's top tier last Saturday.PHOTO: EPSON SINGAPORE

There are five bins standing against a wall in the laundry room of Matsumoto Yamaga's Karigane clubhouse. One each for turtlenecks, long-sleeved tops, track pants, short-sleeved tops and goalkeeping attire - pasted with a picture of each kit, which is provided to first-team players of the Japanese football team.

These innocuous bins sit in front of a board on which players' game statistics, including heart rate, total distance run and sprints made, are put up.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on November 22, 2018, with the headline 'An eye-opening partnership'. Print Edition | Subscribe