Animal sightings

Wild in the city

(Far left) A red junglefowl seen in Riverina View in Pasir Ris in February and (left) a wild boar hit by a passing bus in October, after attacking a man outside a condominium in Hillview Avenue.
(Above) A red junglefowl seen in Riverina View in Pasir Ris in February and a wild boar hit by a passing bus in October, after attacking a man outside a condominium in Hillview Avenue.PHOTOS: KEVIN LIM, SHIN MIN DAILY NEWS
(Far left) A red junglefowl seen in Riverina View in Pasir Ris in February and (left) a wild boar hit by a passing bus in October, after attacking a man outside a condominium in Hillview Avenue.
A red junglefowl seen in Riverina View in Pasir Ris in February and (above) a wild boar hit by a passing bus in October, after attacking a man outside a condominium in Hillview Avenue.PHOTOS: KEVIN LIM, SHIN MIN DAILY NEWS

It is a jungle out there in the Garden City.

Animals are coming out of the woodwork and into urban areas as Singapore's greening efforts take hold, making the concrete jungle more conducive for wildlife.

There have been a myriad animal encounters in the city over the past year - some good, some less so, with wild boars, in particular, being involved in incidents that caused injury to humans.

These incidents have highlighted the need to keep Singapore's animal populations in check. But as the outcry over the culling of free-ranging chickens earlier this year has shown, stop-gap measures like these have proven controversial.

The authorities, animal groups and scientists are now focusing on two key areas for managing animals here: educating people on how to deal with wildlife, and adopting animal management strategies based on scientific studies.

Human safety is paramount and people should not be up in arms if animals have to be culled or relocated to safeguard this. For all that, tolerance is key to co-existence.

Audrey Tan

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on December 27, 2017, with the headline 'Wild in the city'. Print Edition | Subscribe