Why are bubbles round? Find out at science festival

Participants demonstrating a science experiment during a media preview of the Singapore Science Festival on Tuesday. The festival will take place from tomorrow to Sept 15.
Participants demonstrating a science experiment during a media preview of the Singapore Science Festival on Tuesday. The festival will take place from tomorrow to Sept 14.ST PHOTO: ONG WEE KIAT

The science behind why bubbles form in certain liquids and not in others, and the reason they are round, will be explained by scientists at this year's Singapore Science Festival, which will also feature exhibits to show how cutting-edge science is used in everyday items.

The annual festival, now into its 19th edition, will also feature a virtual reality flight simulator created by a company founded by a former flight instructor with the Republic of Singapore Air Force.

The event celebrates the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (Stem) fields.

Co-organised by the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*Star) and Science Centre Singapore, the festival will take place over two weeks, from tomorrow to Sept 14.

Associate Professor Lim Tit Meng, chief executive of Science Centre Singapore, said: "The theme of this year's science festival is aimed at demonstrating that Stem is omnipresent and part of every aspect of our lives."

He said the preconception is that science is in complicated things - machines, chemical formulas, labs, for example.

"But what we don't realise is that science is everywhere, including the things we use and rely on every single day," he said.

The festival will feature shows, exhibitions, workshops and activities held in different locations around the city.

It will provide an invaluable opportunity for young students to enhance their science education, said Professor Lisa Ng, executive director of the A*Star Graduate Academy.

"Through these events, students come face to face with the wonders of science in the form of interactive exhibits and workshops. These events also provide them with an avenue to discover the various areas and impact of Stem, and how it brings about great change in the world," she added.

Visitors can enjoy the flight simulator, a mathematical magic show by science communicator Eddie Goldstein, and an art installation using augmented reality.

There will also be child-friendly interactive events.

While chomping down on sweet treats, they can learn the science behind baking.

A*Star and Science Centre Singapore believe the festival can be a powerful avenue in which people of all ages can enjoy science.

"Learning does not stop at the classroom, and we must continue to ensure that our youth, who will be the next generation of science leaders in Singapore, are provided with opportunities to develop their aptitude in the area of Stem," said Prof Ng.

More details can be found at www.science.edu.sg/whats-on/singapore-science-festival


Correction note: This article has been edited for accuracy.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 29, 2019, with the headline 'Why are bubbles round? Find out at science festival'. Print Edition | Subscribe