Viral videos of loan sharks setting fire to flat are from old, solved cases: Police

In one clip, a man is seen punching another through the gate of a flat after mumbling that he "owed money". Other videos show a person setting fire to the doors of flats.
In one clip, a man is seen punching another through the gate of a flat after mumbling that he "owed money". Other videos show a person setting fire to the doors of flats.PHOTOS: SCREENGRABS FROM FACEBOOK/DANIEL NGANASEKARAN

SINGAPORE - A series of four videos showing loan shark harassers setting fire to flats depicts old cases that have been solved, the Singapore Police Force said in response to questions about it on Facebook on Monday (March 5).

Facebook user Kah Tat Quek shared the post on the Singapore Police Force's Facebook page on Sunday, with the message: "Please do something about this ah long (loan shark)."

The original post was by Daniel Nganasekaran, who shared four videos on the social media platform on March 2. It is unclear where the videos were taken, when they were taken or if they are linked.

In the first clip, which has been viewed more than 880,000 times, the video taker follows a tattooed man in a black top and jeans to a flat on the ninth floor of a building.

He is seen punching a man through the gate of the flat after mumbling that he "owed money".

Other videos show a person setting fire to the doors of flats.

Mr Nganasekaran's post has been shared more than 10,000 times, while the four videos have drawn more than 1.5 million views in total.

The police wrote in a reply to Mr Quek's post: "The police have established that these videos are from past cases which have been solved."

"Members of the public are advised against speculating or spreading unverified information to avoid creating unnecessary alarm," said the police.

It called for anyone with information on unlicensed moneylending activities to lodge a police report at any neighbourhood police post or to do so online.

Mr Quek responded: "Thanks for the reply. Someone posted recently so I got alarmed. Sorry for any inconvenience caused."

The police later posted a statement on their own Facebook page, saying the cases were from 2015 and 2017 and have been solved.

"The police have zero tolerance against such lawless acts of loanshark harassment which threaten the community’s sense of safety," they wrote. "We will continue with our tough enforcement actions and spare no effort to ensure offenders face the full brunt of the law."

First-time offenders found guilty of carrying on a business of unlicensed moneylending may be jailed for up to four years, fined between $30,000 and $300,000, and punished with up to six strokes of the cane.

First-time offenders found guilty of assisting in the business of unlicensed moneylending face the same penalties.

First-time offenders found guilty of acting on behalf of an unlicensed moneylender, committing or attempting to commit any acts of harassment face a jail term of up to five years, a fine of between $5,000 and $50,000, and between three and six strokes of the cane.