Two health initiatives launched for residents in Bukit Gombak and Choa Chu Kang

(From left) Minister Indranee Rajah looks on after presenting motorised wheelchairs to Madam Posperwadr Krishnasamy, Mr Joseph Payrumal Kalipayruma and Madam Rose Tan Beng Kee at the Sri Thendayuthapani Temple.
(From left) Minister Indranee Rajah looks on after presenting motorised wheelchairs to Madam Posperwadr Krishnasamy, Mr Joseph Payrumal Kalipayruma and Madam Rose Tan Beng Kee at the Sri Thendayuthapani Temple.ST PHOTO: JONATHAN CHOO

SINGAPORE - Two health initiatives were launched on Sunday (Sept 16) to better serve the needs of residents in western Singapore.

One involves installing more automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in Bukit Gombak, and the other is the setting up of six community health posts in Choa Chu Kang.

Some 37 AEDs will be installed in Bukit Gombak over the next two years, including in private condominiums. The move, spearheaded by the Bukit Gombak Citizens' Consultative Committee, will help ensure that more people survive heart attacks that occur outside of hospitals. Only one in five people survive such incidents.

The community health posts in Choa Chu Kang are meant to help people aged 40 and above better manage chronic health conditions.

The posts, which will be staffed by trained nurses, will be set up in the four community clubs in Chua Chu Kang GRC, as well as Al-Khair Mosque and Ar-Raudhah Mosque.

"Basic health assessments are conducted to identify those with early signs of health decline, who will then be advised to seek further medical evaluation," said Health Minister Gan Kim Yong at the launch event.

"If needed, they can help to facilitate referrals to primary care or community services for such evaluations," added Mr Gan, who is also an MP for Chua Chu Kang GRC.

Meanwhile, at a separate event on Sunday, Minister in the Prime Minister's Office Indranee Rajah spoke of the role the community plays to make ageing a positive experience for all Singaporeans.

Growing old must not be a lonely or frightening experience but a fulfilling one, she said.

"The Government will do its part... But building hospitals, senior care centres, polyclinics - that's only part of it," said Ms Indranee.

"The other part of it is the community because there are some things which don't need medical care but which (people) need help for, like loneliness."

Ms Indranee was speaking at a morning charity event at the Sri Thendayuthapani Temple in Tank Road. It was organised by the Chettiars' Temple Society.

At the event, seven seniors each received a gift of a motorised wheelchair, and the society also donated a $130,000 mobile clinic to the Sunlove Abode for Intellectually-Infirmed.

Mr M. Nachiappan, who is president of the society, said that the new clinic would help Sunlove reach those who needed help.

"They provide a lot of help to needy people, regardless of race or religion," he said.

Sunlove chairman Wee Lin added that the new mobile clinic would especially help wheelchair users or homebound patients who may have difficulty accessing medical services.

"We need to go to them to provide medical services, and this ambulance will be a great help," Mr Wee said.