Lower speed limit for PMDs from Feb 1

LTA says the new 10kmh speed limit for PMD users and cyclists will give all footpath users more time to react to unforeseen circumstances.
LTA says the new 10kmh speed limit for PMD users and cyclists will give all footpath users more time to react to unforeseen circumstances.ST PHOTO: KUA CHEE SIONG

Cyclists and users of personal mobility devices (PMDs) will no longer be able to ride at speeds above 10kmh on footpaths from Feb 1, the Land Transport Authority (LTA) said yesterday.

In addition, cyclists and PMD users will have to stop and look out for vehicles at road crossings. All cyclists will have to wear helmets when riding on roads.

Meanwhile, personal mobility aids, such as motorised wheelchairs and mobility scooters, will also be required to have a maximum device speed of 10kmh.

LTA said in a statement: "These rules... are part of ongoing efforts to foster greater rider responsibility and encourage safe sharing of our paths and roads."

Both cyclists and users of PMDs questioned the practicality of getting them to travel at what was essentially just a fast running pace.

Under previous rules, cyclists and PMD users could ride on footpaths at a speed of up to 15kmh.

But LTA said lowering the speed limit to 10kmh will allow all path users to have more time to react to unforeseen circumstances.

 
 
 

Anyone caught flouting the rule can be fined up to $1,000 and/or jailed for up to three months upon conviction for the first offence.

The same penalty applies to cyclists who do not wear helmets on roads and people who do not practise the "stop and look" rule.

LTA said the maximum device speed of 10kmh for motorised personal mobility aids will safeguard the use of such devices for only those who genuinely need them.

Anyone convicted of using a non-compliant version of such devices on public paths can be fined up to $5,000 and/or jailed up to three months for the first offence.

Retailers who display or advertise non-compliant personal mobility aids can be fined up to $1,000 and/or jailed for up to three months for the first offence.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 19, 2019, with the headline 'Lower speed limit for PMDs from Feb 1'. Print Edition | Subscribe