ST's multimedia work on show at Through The Lens exhibition

Above: Minister for Communications and Information S. Iswaran (second from right), flanked by Straits Times editor Warren Fernandez and World Press Photo curator Yi Wen Hsia, viewing the World Press Photo of the Year, taken by Getty Images senior sta
Visitors viewing the winning World Press Photo entries at the National Museum last night.ST PHOTOS: NG SOR LUAN
Above: Minister for Communications and Information S. Iswaran (second from right), flanked by Straits Times editor Warren Fernandez and World Press Photo curator Yi Wen Hsia, viewing the World Press Photo of the Year, taken by Getty Images senior sta
Minister for Communications and Information S. Iswaran (second from right), flanked by Straits Times editor Warren Fernandez and World Press Photo curator Yi Wen Hsia, viewing the World Press Photo of the Year, taken by Getty Images senior staff photographer John Moore, at the opening of the exhibition last night. ST PHOTOS: NG SOR LUAN

The pain of a child being sepa-rated from her mother by United States border officials, the anger and passion behind the protests in Hong Kong, and the devastation caused by El Nino and climate change are among the stories told through images and videos at a photo exhibition organised by The Straits Times.

Called Through The Lens, it showcases more than 250 provocative and compelling images captured by Singapore and international photojournalists in the past two years.

The display at Singapore's National Museum opens today and ends on Oct 27. Admission is free.

The exhibition celebrates the best in news photography and comprises The Straits Times Photo Exhibition and World Press Photo (WPP) Exhibition.

The Straits Times Photo Exhibition will showcase 100 photos and 38 videos produced by its photojournalists and video team in 2018 and 2019.

These span seven categories: News, Features, Sports, World, Climate Change, Home in Focus and MyhomeSG.

One highlight is a picture of a protester smashing a glass panel at the Legislative Council building in Hong Kong on July 1, the 22nd anniversary of the city's handover to China.

The image was captured by ST photojournalist Lim Yaohui, who spent 17 days in Hong Kong in June and July covering the protests.

The WPP Exhibition, which is in Singapore for the fifth year, features 157 prize-winning photos from the non-profit organisation's annual competition. This year's edition drew 78,801 entries from 4,738 photographers worldwide.

 
 
 

The winning image shows Honduran toddler Yanela Sanchez crying as she and her mother Sandra Sanchez were taken into custody by US border officials in Texas on June 12 last year. The shot was taken by Getty Images senior staff photographer John Moore.

Speaking at the official opening yesterday, Minister for Communications and Information S. Iswaran said the exhibition is an opportunity to appreciate the art of photography and its power as a medium to tell stories.

"So, whether it is the awesome power of nature, the pain of poverty or privation, the jubilation of victory in war, and the agony and ecstasy that we see in sporting events, photos have a provocative way of capturing these moments in a manner that leaves these moments deeply inscribed in our memories," he said.

Mr Warren Fernandez, editor of The Straits Times and editor-in-chief of Singapore Press Holdings' English/Malay/Tamil Media Group, said: "Visual journalism is very much a part of our day-to-day work at ST, which has been transformed beyond being a newspaper to a multimedia newsroom, and we have tried to showcase this in the exhibition."

People will also be able to attend talks and panel discussions at the museum. The talks include one on climate change by ST journalist Audrey Tan and photojournalist Mark Cheong today, and another on the Hong Kong protests by ST photojournalists Chong Jun Liang and Lim Yaohui on Oct 26.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on October 05, 2019, with the headline 'ST's multimedia work on show at Through The Lens exhibition'. Print Edition | Subscribe