Singapore Customs issues warning on e-mails impersonating its officers

Singapore Customs said it takes a serious view of such incidents as they undermine public trust in it.
Singapore Customs said it takes a serious view of such incidents as they undermine public trust in it. PHOTO: SINGAPORE CUSTOMS

SINGAPORE - Singapore Customs has warned the public to beware of e-mails impersonating its officers.

In an advisory on Sunday (May 7), it said some members of the public had received such e-mails that were purportedly sent by Singapore Customs officers.

The e-mails requested that recipients do one of the following:

  • Open an e-mail link or file attachment;
  • Transfer a sum of money to accounts belonging to an individual;
  • Provide bank account details;
  • Provide confidential personal information such as identification numbers, passwords and/or credit card numbers.

"Singapore Customs would like to clarify that such e-mails were not sent by our officers," the advisory said.

"Singapore Customs does not ask for confidential personal information through e-mails nor do we send official correspondence from personal e-mail accounts such as Gmail, Yahoo, Hotmail or other unofficial e-mail domains."

Singapore Customs added that it has referred the matter to the police for investigation.

Members of the public who receive such impersonation e-mails should ignore them and not follow the sender's instructions.

They should also not click on any link or open any file attachments as the contents may be malicious, and not provide their personal details to the sender.

If in doubt, contact Singapore Customs at customs_feedback@customs.gov.sg to verify the authenticity of any correspondence received from Singapore Customs.