Should people be trained to fight back during a terror attack? Experts weigh in

Afghan refugee and local resident Abdul Aziz (left) speaking with a man who came to thank him for his bravery during an interview with AFP in Christchurch on March 17, 2019, two days after he chased a gunman at Linwood Mosque.
Afghan refugee and local resident Abdul Aziz (left) speaking with a man who came to thank him for his bravery during an interview with AFP in Christchurch on March 17, 2019, two days after he chased a gunman at Linwood Mosque.PHOTO: AFP
Officers in action during a simulated attack at 313@Somerset as part of Exercise Heartbeat in January.
Officers in action during a simulated attack at 313@Somerset as part of Exercise Heartbeat in January.PHOTO: ST FILE

SINGAPORE - In the event of a terror attack, Singapore advises civilians on the ground to "Run, Hide, Tell".

But during the Christchurch mass shootings last Friday (March 15), a worshipper, instead of running or hiding, chose to fight the attacker.

Please or to continue reading the full article. Learn more about ST PREMIUM.

Enjoy unlimited access to ST's best work

  • Exclusive stories and features on multiple devices
  • In-depth analyses and opinion pieces
  • ePaper and award-winning multimedia content