Protecting migratory birds with tracking tech

An aerial view of the Mandai Mangrove and Mudflat, which will be designated a nature park. During low tides, the extensive mudflat provides a rich feeding ground for birds. The move to conserve the mudflat was hailed by nature groups as an important
An aerial view of the Mandai Mangrove and Mudflat, which will be designated a nature park. PHOTO: NATIONAL PARKS BOARD

Trackers prove Mandai Mangrove is key food source for birds roosting at Sungei Buloh

Technology has not only confirmed what conservationists believed about the key role the Mandai Mangrove and Mudflat plays for migratory birds stopping at the Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve, it has also helped the mudflat earn nature park status.

Through radio trackers and, more recently, satellite transmitters, National Parks Board (NParks) staff could prove that the birds that roost at Sungei Buloh during their long flights south for the winter go to the mudflat to hunt for food.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on October 11, 2018, with the headline 'Protecting migratory birds with tracking tech'. Print Edition | Subscribe