Perdaus childcare and student centre expands to meet rising demands in Yuhua

The newly renovated Iyad Perdaus Child Development (Jurong East) centre is now able to serve more than 220 children.
The newly renovated Iyad Perdaus Child Development (Jurong East) centre is now able to serve more than 220 children. ST PHOTO: LAU FOOK KONG

SINGAPORE - Muslim voluntary welfare organisation Perdaus has expanded its existing childcare and student care centre in Jurong East to meet rising demands from residents in Yuhua.

The newly renovated Iyad Perdaus Child Development (Jurong East) centre is now able to serve more than 220 children, an increase from its previous capacity of 130 children.

With the expansion of a new wing, Iyad Perdaus is not only able to cater to more children, but also a wider age group - from infants to primary school pupils. Previously, it catered to primary school pupils only.

The expansion would address the long waiting list of children who would like to enrol at the centre, located at Jurong East Street 24.

Iyad Perdaus also caters to children with special needs, under a programme called the Integrated Child Care Programme.

Although 80 per cent of the children are Muslim, the centre accepts children of other races and religions as it adopts the mainstream childcare curriculum.

Minister for Culture, Community and Youth, Ms Grace Fu, who officiated the launch of the centre on Friday (July 29) morning, welcomed the expansion and praised Iyad Perdaus for its varied services.

She said: "I encourage Perdaus to continue on this journey (to provide for children of different age groups and needs). As a society that is truly caring and inclusive, we need to treat children with special needs as part of the community and to support them equally, if not more."

Ms Fu, also Member of Parliament for Yuhua, also commended Perdaus for its good work serving the needs of the Muslim community in Singapore.

"I encourage you to continue educating the children about Islam in the Singapore context because we are living in a multi-racial community," she said.

"We need to adapt the teaching, the values that are suitable to the Singapore context so that we can prosper together as a united people, regardless of race and religion."