Minor Issues: Speaking the 5 love languages with one’s kids

When children feel appreciated and loved, they develop emotional stability and confidence in themselves. ST PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI
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SINGAPORE – “To help is to love.” This has been one of my mother’s favourite mantras whenever she needed someone’s help with the household chores. When I was an angsty teenager, I could never understand nor agree with it.

With my father and my older siblings at work, I was the only one left at home to help with the chores, especially on weekdays. It was certainly a chore for me and I did not find any love in doing them.

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