Out to identify and photograph fungi of Singapore

Entoloma burkillae, which mushroom enthusiast Ace Le calls the Blue Galaxy mushroom because its cap has a matte velvety look that resembles a starry night. Like other Entoloma species, it releases pink spores when it matures. This Clavulinopsis fusif
Coprinellus disseminatus (above), also known as the fairy inkcap, is an edible mushroom that does not dissolve into black ink in maturity like other inkcap species.PHOTOS: ACE LE
Entoloma burkillae, which mushroom enthusiast Ace Le calls the Blue Galaxy mushroom because its cap has a matte velvety look that resembles a starry night. Like other Entoloma species, it releases pink spores when it matures. This Clavulinopsis fusif
Entoloma burkillae, which mushroom enthusiast Ace Le calls the Blue Galaxy mushroom because its cap has a matte velvety look that resembles a starry night. Like other Entoloma species, it releases pink spores when it matures.PHOTOS: ACE LE
Entoloma burkillae, which mushroom enthusiast Ace Le calls the Blue Galaxy mushroom because its cap has a matte velvety look that resembles a starry night. Like other Entoloma species, it releases pink spores when it matures. This Clavulinopsis fusif
The stunning Microporus xanthopus (above) has a thin, funnel-shaped cap with concentric rings in different shades of brown. The caps are supported by a yellow-footed stem.PHOTOS: ACE LE
Entoloma burkillae, which mushroom enthusiast Ace Le calls the Blue Galaxy mushroom because its cap has a matte velvety look that resembles a starry night. Like other Entoloma species, it releases pink spores when it matures. This Clavulinopsis fusif
This Clavulinopsis fusiformis (above), sometimes called the coral fungus, was found at Lower Peirce Reservoir.PHOTOS: ACE LE

The world of fungi has given humanity many benefits such as medicine and food, and their fruiting bodies come in a dizzying array of shapes, colours and sizes.

More than 70,000 species have been described worldwide, yet the group remains woefully understudied, a situation that is little different in Singapore.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on October 04, 2018, with the headline 'Out to identify and photograph fungi of Singapore'. Print Edition | Subscribe