Opening this Friday the 13th, an exhibition to scare away your fears

Called Phobia-square: The Science of Fear, the exhibition explores the historical and cultural significance of fear, its psychology and physiology and how it affects our daily lives.
Called Phobia-square: The Science of Fear, the exhibition explores the historical and cultural significance of fear, its psychology and physiology and how it affects our daily lives.ST PHOTO: SEAH KWANG PENG
Called Phobia-square: The Science of Fear, the exhibition explores the historical and cultural significance of fear, its psychology and physiology and how it affects our daily lives.
Called Phobia-square: The Science of Fear, the exhibition explores the historical and cultural significance of fear, its psychology and physiology and how it affects our daily lives.ST PHOTO: SEAH KWANG PENG
Called Phobia-square: The Science of Fear, the exhibition explores the historical and cultural significance of fear, its psychology and physiology and how it affects our daily lives.
Called Phobia-square: The Science of Fear, the exhibition explores the historical and cultural significance of fear, its psychology and physiology and how it affects our daily lives.ST PHOTO: SEAH KWANG PENG

SINGAPORE - You might have had sweaty palms or broken out in cold sweat before entering an examination hall, or felt giddy from being in a narrow space.

There's a chance now for you to overcome such fears - as well as that of being buried alive - at a new exhibition opening on Friday (April 13) at Science Centre Singapore.

Called Phobia²: The Science of Fear, the exhibition explores the historical and cultural significance of fear, its psychology and physiology and how it affects our daily lives.

Science Centre Singapore chief executive Lim Tit Meng said: "Singaporeans are afraid of all kinds of things, from not getting their children into a good school to fear of not doing well in exams. The whole idea of fear is so Singaporean.

"We want to bring an understanding that there are some things that you can be fearful of but some things you can take it easy."

He added that the exhibition is conceptualised to help guests understand and overcome some of their darkest fears.

For example, visitors can lie down in a mock coffin and experience the feeling of being buried alive. Or they can enter a conical room designed in a swirling black and white pattern, which gets smaller as they walk into the room.


Visitors can enter a conical room designed in a swirling black and white pattern, which gets smaller as they walk into the room. PHOTO: SEAH KWANG PENG 

Another exhibit features a room with study desks that contain TV panels showing clips of students talking about exam fears and offering tips on how to overcome these.


Another exhibit features a room with study desks that contain TV panels showing clips of students talking about exam fears and offering tips on how to overcome these.  PHOTO: SEAH KWANG PENG 

The exhibition, which is meant to be a long-term one lasting up to five years, will be on daily from 10am to 6pm.

It is free of charge, though general admission fees to Science Centre Singapore still apply. Singaporeans and permanent residents pay $4 to $6 to visit the Science Centre, while foreigners pay $8 to $12. Singaporeans and PRs can enjoy free admission on weekdays during the school term.

The Science Centre will also be hosting the Phobia Party on Friday and Saturday as part of its new after-hours series featuring fun and engaging activities. Admission to the party is $20.