Must-read

THE BIG STORY

MAS commits $2.4 billion to green investments

Singapore's central bank is committing US$1.8 billion ($2.38 billion) of the country's official foreign reserves to climate-related investment opportunities. The Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) also said it was working to safeguard the financial sector against environmental risks and to promote green finance.




THE BIG STORY

S. Korea aims to speed up talks on travel bubble

South Korea is hoping to expedite travel bubble talks with the likes of Singapore and Taiwan to allow quarantine-free travel for fully vaccinated people from as early as next month, as part of a campaign to encourage mass vaccination. Only 4.5 per cent of the population have been fully vaccinated since jabs were rolled out. 




WORLD

Malaysian King meets party chiefs amid crises

Malaysian Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin arrived at the palace early yesterday, in what appeared to be the first of a series of audiences that the King is granting to party chiefs to discuss the country's coronavirus and political crises. Opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim was next. 




SINGAPORE

Energy-saving standards to be stricter from 2022

Refrigerators, clothes dryers and air-conditioners will need to meet stricter minimum energy performance standards from next year, said the National Environment Agency. The new minimum standards will be two ticks on the Mandatory Energy Labelling Scheme, up from the current one tick. 




BUSINESS

S'pore Flyer operator wins $8.2m in insurance case

Straco Corp, which operates the Singapore Flyer, has won a financial arbitration case, and said it had been awarded some $8.2 million. The award arises from a dispute over its claim against its insurer for losses it suffered from the breakdown and subsequent shutdown of the Singapore Flyer for several months in 2018. 


OPINION

Asean, EU and the swing-state perception

There is thinking in the European Union that it is time it did more for its own security, and in Asia. Associate editor Ravi Velloor looks at why Asean is seen as a bit of a "swing state" in the wider Indo-Pacific, and how geopolitical circumstances and interests are pushing Asean and the EU closer together. 

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 10, 2021, with the headline 'Must-read'. Subscribe