Morning Minutes: What will make headlines, Jan 19, 2017

Key employment trends and other insights will be unveiled by recruitment consultancy Robert Walters on Thursday (Jan 18).
Key employment trends and other insights will be unveiled by recruitment consultancy Robert Walters on Thursday (Jan 18).PHOTO: ST FILE

Good morning! Morning Minutes is a round-up of stories that will break on Thursday (Jan 19) and which we think you'd be interested in.

It appears on weekdays, available by 7am.

Employment trends in 2017

This year's salary-level expectations, the attraction and retention of Singaporean talent, and the job market led by businesses establishing operations in Singapore are among key employment trends that will be unveiled by recruitment consultancy Robert Walters on Thursday (Jan 18).

Other insights like recruitment driven by the technology field and increasing demand for certain human resource roles will also be shared at the launch of its Global Salary Survey 2017.

Inquiry into death of army regular

A coroner’s inquiry into the death of 20-year-old army regular S. Pravinraj begins on Thursday (Jan 19)

The Specialist Cadet Trainee, a supply supervisor trainee, was on guard duty at Sembawang Camp, when he was found dead at around 3.10pm on Nov 21, 2015.

Malaysia's central bank to keep rates steady


Bank Negara Malaysia is forecast to hold its key rate at 3.00 per cent. PHOTO: REUTE
RS

Malaysia’s central bank is expected to keep its benchmark rate steady on Thursday (Jan 19) as policymakers work to stabilise a fragile ringgit currency and support an economy that is just starting to pull ahead after well over a year of slowing growth.

The ringgit tumbled to almost a 20-year low of 4.4980 on Jan 4 as capital was sucked out of emerging countries on bets US interest rates will rise faster to match an expected boost to fiscal spending under incoming US President Donald Trump.

Economists forecast Bank Negara Malaysia to hold its key rate at 3.00 per cent, as a cut to follow its July easing would expose the ringgit to more pressure.

Bank Indonesia to keep policy rates unchanged


Bank Indonesia cut its benchmark six times last year to aid economic growth. PHOTO: REUTERS

Indonesia’s central bank is widely expected to keep its benchmark policy rate unchanged on Thursday (Jan 19) as it monitors the rupiah’s movement at a time of global uncertainty and price pressures at home.

Bank Indonesia (BI) cut its benchmark six times last year, by 150 basis points, to 4.75 per cent to aid economic growth.

During 2016, the inflation rate was low, current account deficit comfortable and the rupiah relatively stable.

“BI’s monetary policy easing cycle may have come to an end,” the World Bank said in a report published on Tuesday. 

Muslim states discuss Rohingya crisis


National flags of the members of Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) states in the holy city of Mecca. The OIC represents 57 states and acts as the collective voice of the Muslim world. PHOTO: AFP

The Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) is holding a special meeting in Kuala Lumpur on Thursday (Jan 19) called by Malaysia to discuss measures to deal with the conflict affecting the Muslim Rohingya minority in Myanmar.

The OIC represents 57 states and acts as the collective voice of the Muslim world.