Meet Kranji Marshes' feathered residents

BLUE-EARED KINGFISHER
BLUE-EARED KINGFISHERPHOTO: LEE TIAH KHEE
BAYA WEAVER
BAYA WEAVERPHOTO: LEE TIAH KHEE
BLUE-THROATED BEE-EATER
BLUE-THROATED BEE-EATERPHOTO: SOLOMON ANTHONY

While it is just a stopover for many birds, Singapore also has its own avian permanent residents.

The Kranji Marshes, a 56.8ha freshwater marshland near Sungei Buloh, is home to more than 170 bird species. Here are three of the marshland's signature species.

BLUE-EARED KINGFISHER

The blue-eared kingfisher is a solitary and shy bird, which has eyes specially developed to see clearly both in the air and when diving underwater.

It is a rare resident and nationally endangered.

BAYA WEAVER

Another uncommon bird, the baya weaver, is found in grasslands and scrubs near fresh water.

The male sings and performs on unfinished nests to attract females.

Once the birds pair up, they complete the nest by adding an egg chamber and entrance tunnel.

BLUE-THROATED BEE-EATER

The blue-throated bee-eater feeds in the morning on insects, using a long bill which protects it from being stung.

It is a common resident and lives in mangroves, woodlands and open scrub areas.

Samantha Boh

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 20, 2017, with the headline 'Meet Kranji Marshes' feathered residents'. Print Edition | Subscribe