Junior journalists fight sleep to meet deadline

Cayden Soh, a Year 1 student at NUS High School of Mathematics and Science, taking a nap during the 24-hour challenge which ended at 10am yesterday. Members of the CHIJ Secondary (Toa Payoh) team rushing to finish their final assignments. Students wh
Members of the CHIJ Secondary (Toa Payoh) team rushing to finish their final assignments. Students who took part in the National Youth Media Competition 2018 had to create a three-page newsletter, make a video and file social media and breaking news updates in a simulated newsroom environment.ST PHOTO: MATTHIAS CHONG
Cayden Soh, a Year 1 student at NUS High School of Mathematics and Science, taking a nap during the 24-hour challenge which ended at 10am yesterday. Members of the CHIJ Secondary (Toa Payoh) team rushing to finish their final assignments. Students wh
Cayden Soh, a Year 1 student at NUS High School of Mathematics and Science, taking a nap during the 24-hour challenge which ended at 10am yesterday. ST PHOTO: MATTHIAS CHONG

Snacks throughout the night, cold canned coffee, bubble tea and even emotional support from a stuffed animal or two got the 13 teams from 11 schools through a rigorous 24-hour challenge.

The National Youth Media Competition 2018, which ended at 10am yesterday, had 74 students create a three-page newsletter targeted at youth, make a video and file social media and breaking news updates in a simulated newsroom environment.

Some teams worked through the night, recording voice-overs, editing videos or laying out stories, taking turns to take power naps.

Cai Zhenxin, 15, from Swiss Cottage Secondary School, said: "The overnight part was the most memorable. The rush to get work done. Also, the amount of effort that you put in.

"You want to sleep but you also need to get the work done."

Carl Benedict Canlas Rosell, 17, from Ngee Ann Secondary School, said he learnt all about persistence through teams having to poll 20 people as part of one of the assignments.

He said: "It was very hard because people kept rejecting (us).

 
 

"There was a guy, he was walking very slowly but when I approached him, he looked at his watch, said he was in a rush and walked away quickly. Another guy had his phone in his pocket but when I approached him, he quickly took out his phone and said he had a call."

Organised by The Straits Times and presented by the National Council on Problem Gambling, the competition aims to improve media literacy and train aspiring young newshounds.

The results will be announced at a prize presentation in November.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 06, 2018, with the headline 'Junior journalists fight sleep to meet deadline'. Print Edition | Subscribe