Insects that work to support the ecosystem

A Phaneroptera brevis katydid visiting the flower of the water Mimosa Neptunia plena. A Tagasta marginella grasshopper on a morning glory flower. Doctoral student Tan Ming Kai's research is important as the findings help farmers distinguish potential
Doctoral student Tan Ming Kai's research is important as the findings help farmers distinguish potential pollinators from pests.PHOTO: LIN ZHAOWEI FOR THE STRAITS TIMES
A Phaneroptera brevis katydid visiting the flower of the water Mimosa Neptunia plena. A Tagasta marginella grasshopper on a morning glory flower. Doctoral student Tan Ming Kai's research is important as the findings help farmers distinguish potential
A nymph of the Phaneroptera brevis katydid in Mandai visiting the Singapore daisy Sphagneticola trilobata.PHOTO: TAN MING KAI
A Phaneroptera brevis katydid visiting the flower of the water Mimosa Neptunia plena. A Tagasta marginella grasshopper on a morning glory flower. Doctoral student Tan Ming Kai's research is important as the findings help farmers distinguish potential
A Tagasta marginella grasshopper on a morning glory flower. PHOTO: TAN MING KAI

Some grasshoppers and crickets are among insects that pollinate flowers the way bees do

Plant owners view grasshoppers and crickets as greenery-eating pests, but new research indicates some of these insects pollinate flowers in the same way butterflies and bees do.

These new-found pollinators belong to the family of insects known as orthopterans, according to doctoral student Tan Ming Kai, who made the discovery in a three-year study of five South-east Asian countries, including Singapore.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 16, 2018, with the headline 'Insects that work to support the ecosystem'. Print Edition | Subscribe