Mobile medical apps

Quick medical tips from MyDoc

A mock MyDoc video consultation between a patient (inset) and a doctor. The app plans to offer online medical certificates next month to the enterprises it works with.
A mock MyDoc video consultation between a patient (inset) and a doctor. The app plans to offer online medical certificates next month to the enterprises it works with.PHOTO: MYDOC

The app allows users to tele-consult doctors and pharmacists on simple illnesses

For simple tele-consultations with doctors and pharmacists from the convenience of one's home, the MyDoc app has been gaining ground with a growing number of users.

And next month, it plans to offer online medical certificates to the enterprises that it works with.

Launched five years ago by two doctors, the app gives users direct access within the hour to doctors from Acumed Group, L&C Medical Group and individual group clinics, as well as pharmacists from Guardian.

The firm also holds health screenings for small and medium-sized enterprises in Singapore, in partnership with organisations such as the Health Promotion Board.

Test results are sent to users through the app in less than a week - half the time needed for traditional screenings, said MyDoc's co-founder Snehal Patel, an American who studied medicine and law at Columbia University in the United States.

Users can then follow up with doctors through the app, if needed.

A mock MyDoc video consultation between a patient (inset) and a doctor. The app plans to offer online medical certificates next month to the enterprises it works with.
A mock MyDoc video consultation between a patient (inset) and a doctor. The app plans to offer online medical certificates next month to the enterprises it works with. PHOTO: MYDOC

Dr Patel said the app has a 60 per cent to 85 per cent follow-up rate with a doctor, compared with less than 10 per cent via traditional health screenings.

"At MyDoc, we work with insurers (AXA, AIA and Aetna) and corporations (HPB) directly to provide healthcare services like doctor consultations, online prescriptions and online medical certificates."

Mr Jeremy Foo, 31, a MyDoc user, said he liked how easy it was to get medical advice to treat simple illnesses, especially with his busy schedule.

"I wasn't feeling too well, but I was too busy to go to the doctor. I wanted to find out what medication I could take for a sore throat and slight fever.

"I sent a message and got a response from a Guardian pharmacist pretty quickly," said the co-founder and director of a marketing consultancy firm.

However, the app is meant only for the diagnosis of non-critical illnesses.

Users have to answer questions like whether they are bleeding or feeling breathless. If they are, the app will advise them to visit a healthcare professional instead.

MyDoc is available in Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong and Sri Lanka. It has been downloaded about 50,000 times from Google Play and the Apple Store.

It has more than 30,000 active users, with the majority of users aged between 20 and 30 years, said Dr Patel.

Felicia Choo

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 29, 2017, with the headline 'Quick medical tips from MyDoc'. Print Edition | Subscribe