NUS team designing anti-cancer drug that has fewer toxic effects

Associate Professor Ang Wee Han, Associate Professor Giorgia Pastorin and Dr Maria Babak (far right) with the new drug they are developing that can distinguish between cancer and healthy cells. PHOTO: NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE
Associate Professor Ang Wee Han, Associate Professor Giorgia Pastorin and Dr Maria Babak (far right) with the new drug they are developing that can distinguish between cancer and healthy cells. PHOTO: NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE

New drug can zero in on energy centres of cancer cells while avoiding healthy ones

Scientists here are developing an anti-cancer drug which, unlike its peers, can "home in" on the energy production centres of cancer cells and destroy them - leaving healthy cells and tissues untouched in the process.

Together with a counterpart from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the team of three researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) is developing an anti-cancer drug with better treatment outcomes to serve as an alternative to cisplatin, a platinum-based drug which has been used since 1965.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 19, 2019, with the headline 'NUS team designing anti-cancer drug that has fewer toxic effects'. Print Edition | Subscribe