NUS researchers' new 'Trojan horse' drug could eliminate cancer tissue with fewer toxic effects

(From left) Associate Professor Giorgia Pastorin, Associate Professor Ang Wee Han and Dr Maria Babak with the new drug they are developing, which could eliminate cancer tissues with fewer toxic effects.
(From left) Associate Professor Giorgia Pastorin, Associate Professor Ang Wee Han and Dr Maria Babak with the new drug they are developing, which could eliminate cancer tissues with fewer toxic effects.PHOTO: NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE

SINGAPORE - Scientists here are developing an anti-cancer drug which, unlike its peers, can "home in" on the energy production centres of cancer cells and destroy them - leaving healthy cells and tissues untouched in the process.

Together with a counterpart from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the team of three researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) were looking into developing an anti-cancer drug with better treatment outcomes to serve as an alternative to cisplatin, a platinum-based drug which has been used since 1965.

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