'Chemobrain' the new enemy in cancer fight

Ms Chan Yoke (seated) with her mother Lina Toh, 74. Ms Chan, who completed chemotherapy two years ago, still finds it hard to focus and becomes tired easily.
Ms Chan Yoke (seated) with her mother Lina Toh, 74. Ms Chan, who completed chemotherapy two years ago, still finds it hard to focus and becomes tired easily.ST PHOTO: ALPHONSUS CHERN

Doctors turn attention to tackling patients' cognitive issues after chemotherapy is over

More than two years after Ms Chan Yoke completed chemotherapy treatment, some side effects still remain. In particular, the 49-year-old graphic designer finds it harder to focus now than before and becomes tired more easily.

"I don't think I'm back to normal," said Ms Chan, who was diagnosed with breast cancer in late 2014 and underwent treatment the following year.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on April 09, 2018, with the headline ''Chemobrain' the new enemy in cancer fight'. Print Edition | Subscribe