Hari Raya bazaar goes hipster... but traditional food still draws the crowds

This year's Bazaar Raya Utara features a record 80 stalls, selling everything from street food to homemade Hari Raya goodies.
This year's Bazaar Raya Utara features a record 80 stalls, selling everything from street food to homemade Hari Raya goodies.ST PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI
This year's Bazaar Raya Utara features a record 80 stalls, selling everything from street food to homemade Hari Raya goodies.
This year's Bazaar Raya Utara features a record 80 stalls, selling everything from street food to homemade Hari Raya goodies.ST PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI

SINGAPORE - New stalls featuring “hipster” dishes are making their way into an annual Hari Raya bazaar – but traditional food is still drawing the crowds.

The Bazaar Raya Utara, set up next to Causeway Point mall in Woodlands, was officially launched on Saturday (May 19) by MPs for Sembawang GRC – Senior Parliamentary Secretary for Home Affairs and Health Amrin Amin, Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan, Education Minister Ong Ye Kung, Mr Vikram Nair and Dr Lim Wee Kiak.

The event, now in its 16th year, features a record 80 stalls, selling everything from street food to homemade Hari Raya goodies.

The bazaar, which will run from 10am to 11pm till June 12, has drawn between 5,000 and 10,000 visitors a day since it opened on Monday (May 14).

In an effort to cater to the younger crowd, the bazaar features a growing selection of hipster dishes – such as Dutch baby pancakes offered by dessert bar Cake Love, while other stalls offer churros, russet fries and Thai milk tea.

A new air-conditioned section also houses apparel and fashion stalls, such as Muslimah fashion brand Ayu Apparels and online store Vintagewknd.


A new air-conditioned section at the Bazaar Raya Utara houses apparel and fashion stalls. ST PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI

“We’re making changes... but also at the same time, we’ve not forgotten traditional favourites,” said Mr Amrin. “We innovate, we change... but we also keep what’s best.”

Traditional food stalls still comprise the bulk of the bazaar’s offerings, with the longest lines dedicated to crowd favourites such as nasi padang and the ever-popular Ramly burger.

And for visitors such as Ms Siti Namirah, 27, a student, the traditional stalls remain the main attraction.

“Hipster food is usually more expensive,” she said. “The food from traditional stalls is cheaper and often nicer as well. I grew up coming to these bazaars and eating this food from a young age. So it’s special to me.”