Follow the energy trail

A sign warning of falling ice at Singapore's LNG terminal. Mechanical arms that connect to LNG tankers must first be cooled, which causes ice to form on their surface. When this ice melts, it falls on the dock below.
A sign warning of falling ice at Singapore's LNG terminal. Mechanical arms that connect to LNG tankers must first be cooled, which causes ice to form on their surface. When this ice melts, it falls on the dock below.ST PHOTO: KELVIN CHNG

Singapore's power network has come a long way since its early days of diesel generators and cheap copper wires.

At the liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal, a sign cautions workers of the dangers of falling ice - a rare hazard in sunny Singapore, and a by-product of the process by which supercooled LNG is transferred from tankers to storage facilities on Jurong Island.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on October 05, 2019, with the headline 'Follow the energy trail'. Print Edition | Subscribe