GenerationGrit

Finding his way through a pit of rage

Dominique Dillon, 27, was born out of wedlock. As a child, he was constantly bullied. Today, he is a youth worker who helps others like him.
Mr Dillon with his mother when he was a baby (left) and in 2010 (right). He said that Madam Theresa, who had bipolar disorder and heart and kidney problems, had never once given up on him. Mr Dominique Dillon, 28, with a picture of his mother Theresa
Mr Dominique Dillon, 28, with a picture of his mother Theresa Anthonysamy, who died last year. His parents were never married and he had felt rejected and unwanted by his father. Now a youth worker, Mr Dillion said that when he was in secondary school, his rage led him to fight with his mother and blow up over the smallest slights.ST PHOTO: DESMOND WEE
Mr Dillon with his mother when he was a baby (left) and in 2010 (right). He said that Madam Theresa, who had bipolar disorder and heart and kidney problems, had never once given up on him. Mr Dominique Dillon, 28, with a picture of his mother Theresa
Mr Dillon with his mother when he was a baby (above) and in 2010. He said that Madam Theresa, who had bipolar disorder and heart and kidney problems, had never once given up on him. PHOTOS: COURTESY OF DOMINIQUE DILLON
Mr Dillon with his mother when he was a baby (left) and in 2010 (right). He said that Madam Theresa, who had bipolar disorder and heart and kidney problems, had never once given up on him. Mr Dominique Dillon, 28, with a picture of his mother Theresa
Mr Dillon with his mother when he was a baby and in 2010 (above). He said that Madam Theresa, who had bipolar disorder and heart and kidney problems, had never once given up on him. PHOTOS: COURTESY OF DOMINIQUE DILLON

Mr Dominique Dillon grew up without his father, and the void filled him with anger and sorrow. But the unwavering support of other adults showed him a life with love and hope, and today he devotes himself to paying it forward, he tells The Straits Times in this series about inspiring millennials.

Mr Dominique Dillon, 28, remembers vividly the first time he knew he was different from other children.

He was with other seven-year-old classmates, and it dawned on him that they all had a father, except him.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 28, 2018, with the headline 'Finding his way through a pit of rage'. Print Edition | Subscribe